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  1. 1,770 votes

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    FoxNZ commented  · 

    > — Amount of Ads —

    Congrats you found yourself joining a stream in which the streamer has also enabled Mid-Roll ads which could result in the behaviour that you're seeing, or by looking at the date of this uservoice this also could be the result of advertisements being shown improperly, since checks (such as if you've already received a pre-roll from another streamer, if you came from a raid, if you're watching from an embed etc.) on your video player may not be properly loading/functioning.

    Which I guess is an argument that Twitch is buggy in someways... but that can also be said for any website on the internet, and can be more so that Twitch is a User Generated Content publishing site that is uploading, downloading, distributing and transcoding information 24/7.

    > — No Control for Content Creators —

    > It‘s about the content won‘t be interrupted suddenly by an ads in the worse timing, well how could we prevent that?

    Some time (I believe?) after this user voice was made, the Ad Scheduler was added to help notify streamers that an ad-break was approaching (in which they can delay it by 5 minutes if the scenario TheEpsilonAlpha has said occurs) and how spaced out they can make mid-roll ad breaks be throughout their streams.

    This isn't as far of a solution as like disabling ads completely from their channel, but I think this feature is a good definition of giving ad break control to the streamer.

    > Many Streamers i spoke with recommended their viewers to install adblockers to keep them in the channel!

    Which is not recommended at all, since some "Twitch Adblockers" have the tendency to break checks and functions of the video player, resulting in Subscribers seeing ads, or people seeing multiple ads after a sequence of ads (which may explain the previous issue in this post)

    >— Implementation Failures and Bugs —

    > We, as Twitch Viewers, are already used to bugs all over the place: Emotes and Badges don‘t load, Whisper Function does often not working.

    It's almost like Twitch is a platform run through multiple remote servers having to send, encode, transcode and distribute data to users all over the world, and there exists a couple of failure points and issues that come as a result of the complexity of this service.

    > The mid-rolls have also been served to subscribers of channels which is a complete no-go.

    Again can be caused by factors internal (video player not loading properly) or external (user installing a "Twitch Adblocker")

    > Obviously nobody tested that before implementing it into production or the test methods are not working at all.

    I mean, the best test for a global distribution of a feature is to... test it globally, which means implementing it to random assortment of channels to see if the performance of the feature is similar to internal tests. Obviously something did go wrong, but that's also why that wasn't initially announced in the first place.

    > — Ads for Bits Function —

    A regional problem, as a result of a range of factors. The biggest of which is that, depending on the season and place you live in the world, businesses spend more money on marketing & advertisements in more dense, urban and populated areas than those living in rural, less populated, or more remote areas of the world. As a result, the implementation of Ads for Bits raises two complications:

    1. How much of an ad equals 1 bit?
    2. How many paid advertising spots are able to fulfill these optional demands?

    If 1. can't be calculated to a sustainable amount for Twitch, the feature is not implemented. If not that many business or companies want their adverts being played on an optional ad spot that's controlled by a viewer (who may or may not be active), then the feature is not implemented.

    Also Amazon Ads are different from Twitch Ads, because both are technically separate business entities with separate income sources for advertisements. Amazon display ads to their ecommerce store, Twitch display ads to their platform's video player. If one asks to the other to have some of their ads play on their platform for no additional cost or compensation, both would immediately say no.

  2. 351 votes

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    FoxNZ commented  · 

    > 1. Give the creators an actual cut of the ad revenue

    Not sure what the current rate of ad revenue is, but so far Twitch is promoting around a 55% ad revenue split on all mid-roll & pre-roll ads being displayed, but that amount varies depending on viewership, ads being shown in parts of the world, and stream duration.

    So the amount is not a lot... but that is to be expected for any other streaming platform, since the amount stems from how much advertisers are willing to spend on ads in Twitch.

    > 2. Make your ads shorter and skippable

    Great for viewers. TERRIBLE for advertisers and companies. If you're a business wanting to advertise on Twitch, you would only be able to make ACTIVE viewers see around 5 second of your ad, and then they leave and most likely forget whatever you wanted to advertise. Compare that to a 10 to 15 second unskippable ad, or better a 30 second ad, that grabs more of the viewer's attention, plus would reduce costs if you have to adapt a longer length advert into 'social media friendly' lengths and formats.

    Basically, no business would choose this feature if they were given the option to do so.

    > 3. Consider adding closable lower third ads

    Display ads are being experimented on as of making this comment, but just like "skippable" video ads, it's a risky and terrible value for companies looking to pay for advertisements. Plus, in terms of accessibility, how could that be introduced for mobile users and how easy, UI wise, could the ads be 'closed'?

    > 4. Let creators and viewers (individually) control mid-rolls

    Creators have control over mid-roll ads playing on their streams, however pre-roll ads are still automatically given unless the creator has previously played a mid-roll ad before. Viewers, both inactive and active, if given the control of playing mid-roll ads are straight up not going to do it. If you think about this more hard, the only time where you would feel comfortable to play an "intrusive video ad" is where you're not paying attention at all to the streamer... again something that ruins the value and point of Twitch selling ad spots. Plus, viewers in general wouldn't want to play their own ads for no personal return... leading to:

    > 5. Bits for ads

    This feature has only been implemented in select parts of the world, but due to the varying legislation in the world about how advertisements should be presented, the inconsistent coverage of marketing being used around the world (since the world's population isn't evenly distributed) and the difficult conversion between how much of an ad equals a single or 100 bits, this feature has great difficulty in being widespread.

    > 6. A certain amount of paid subs (gift subs excluded) = Twitch Turbo

    What counts as a "certain amount"? If the threshold is when the user's spending of subscriptions equal to the price of Twitch Turbo per month, then, in my opinion, that should be offered as a choice to switch, not a reward or addition. Giving Twitch Turbo for "free" as a result of paying for 2 or 3 Tier 1 subscriptions ruins the position of Twitch Turbo in the first place. It's either you pay $9 per month, directly to Twitch, for its benefits (including ad-free viewing) or $10-15 per month, $5-7.5 of which is given to Twitch, for the same benefits.

    It isn't yet confirmed whether Twitch Turbo, like YT Premium, has a greater "ad revenue share" for creators compared to just regular viewers, but if that becomes true it would somewhat be more economical for you to just pay $9 per month to support any channel you wish to visit, rather than $10-15 per month on a single, two or three channels that you watch.

  3. 5 votes

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    FoxNZ shared this idea  ·